3D FOR EDUCATION

It is essential that 3d printers are used and understood by our future generation of engineers and designers so that when they arrive in industry they are already equipped with the knowledge of when it is more appropriate to build with Additive technology. They can design lighter parts, custom parts or parts with structures that simply can’t be made by other methods. Most universities already have some fdm printers, some also have resin printers and a few already have printer “farms” with a great selection of different AM technologies for students to learn on and from. LCD technology should be included as part of any engineering or chemistry department’s equipment.


WORKING WITH UNIVERSITIES AND BUSINESSES

Over the last four years we have perfected the concept, researching in the technology and investing in both product development and blue-sky research around it. We have linked up with universities and corporations and investigated the many new possibilities that daylight offers over conventional UV polymerisation. We are currently in partnership with;

Warwick University- Funding a PhD to synthesize and improve Chlorophyll A. Potential outcomes are increase plant growth efficiency and bio-derived photopolymers

Nottingham University- Funding a 6 month project to develop novel bio-compatible daylight active polymers with largest 3D research center in Europe.

Institute Mulhouse Basle- Developing novel daylight photoinitiators

Case Western Reserve University- We are lending them a Liquid Crystal HR printer to use for the work in developing resins incorporating graphene and nano particles, in particular to improve thermo mechanical properties. 

 

 

















 

The possibilities offered by 3D printing are virtually limitless. We can now make lighter, custom parts created with geometries that are impossible with conventional technologies. To do this effectively, children need to be shown the whole process from the conception of an idea, through its digital incarnation as a CAD design and ending up where they can learn how to slice it as a 3D printable model. Learning this process will be a vital part of the education for the future of digital manufacturing in the forthcoming industry 4.0.

 

 

Secondary Education

The LC HR is an ideal printer for integration into 16-18 STEAM projects and curricular. Its small footprint, low capital and consumable costs, together with low maintenance costs make it the most attractive options for schools and colleges. There are no hot parts hazards, but children must be aware that polymer is an irritant. It can educate them in the whole process from the creation of an idea, through to its CAD incarnation and then onto its presentation as an object created by our 3D printer. 




 

 

 

 

                                               3D FOR EDUCATION

It is essential that 3d printers are used and understood by our future generation of engineers and designers so that when they arrive in industry they are already equipped with the knowledge of when it is more appropriate to build with Additive technology. They can design lighter parts, custom parts or parts with structures that simply can’t be made by other methods. Most universities already have some fdm printers, some also have resin printers and a few already have printer “farms” with a great selection of different AM technologies for students to learn on and from. LCD technology should be included as part of any engineering or chemistry department’s equipment.


WORKING WITH UNIVERSITIES AND BUSINESSES

Over the last four years we have perfected the concept, researching in the technology and investing in both product development and blue-sky research around it. We have linked up with universities and corporations and investigated the many new possibilities that daylight offers over conventional UV polymerisation. We are currently in partnership with;

Warwick University- Funding a PhD to synthesize and improve Chlorophyll A. Potential outcomes are increase plant growth efficiency and bio-derived photopolymers

Nottingham University- Funding a 6 month project to develop novel bio-compatible daylight active polymers with largest 3D research center in Europe.

Institute Mulhouse Basle- Developing novel daylight photoinitiators

Case Western Reserve University- We are lending them a Liquid Crystal HR printer to use for the work in developing resins incorporating graphene and nano particles, in particular to improve thermo mechanical properties. 

 

 

















 

The possibilities offered by 3D printing are virtually limitless. We can now make lighter, custom parts created with geometries that are impossible with conventional technologies. To do this effectively, children need to be shown the whole process from the conception of an idea, through its digital incarnation as a CAD design and ending up where they can learn how to slice it as a 3D printable model. Learning this process will be a vital part of the education for the future of digital manufacturing in the forthcoming industry 4.0.

 

 

Secondary Education

The LC HR is an ideal printer for integration into 16-18 STEAM projects and curricular. Its small footprint, low capital and consumable costs, together with low maintenance costs make it the most attractive options for schools and colleges. There are no hot parts hazards, but children must be aware that polymer is an irritant. It can educate them in the whole process from the creation of an idea, through to its CAD incarnation and then onto its presentation as an object created by our 3D printer. 




 

 

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