3D FOR ENGINEERING

There are hundreds of ways in which 3D printing can be utilized to benefit the engineering industry. New applications of the technology are being explored and developed all the time. Currently most 3D materials are not as strong as ABS, the parts do not end up as smooth as those from an injection molded tool and the prices are much too high. We are working to change all three of those limitations. 

 

                                       

SUITABLE RESINS

Firm resin will allow you to print parts that are tough and durable. The properties of the finished part will allow additional processes such as tapping or machining.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


      ENGINEERING TIPS

When printing very large items, there are a few things to keep in mind. Firstly, does the item need to be solid? You can save a lot of resin, and money, by hollowing out a part. Some 3D printing software, such as Meshmixer, will enable you to do this easily. If you need the part to have some strength, a more generous wall thickness can be used (eg 4-5mm) or you could build an infill structure. Again, there is some software available that can do this automatically. If the part has no structural requirements, a thinner wall can be used (eg 2mm) and an impressive item can be printed using a surprisingly small volume of resin.



 

End-use Functional Parts

With the correct material choice, 3D printing can now generate end-use, functional parts. The technology excels where small batch or one-off production is necessary and can eliminate tooling costs. Bespoke items can be produced quickly and cheaply. It might be a fitted shoe sole customized to the unique shape of your foot, or a spare part that is obsolete or difficult to find. Even larger production runs may be suited to 3D printing if the desired geometry of a component is simply impossible to achieve any other way. There are now printers making metal parts with properties that match those of equivalent machined parts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Prototyping is where 3D printing first took off.
Scale models can be generated to test form, fit and function, ting first took off. Scale models can be generated tat a fraction of the cost of a machined or molded part, in a fraction of the time. Prototypes might be used in destructive testing to identify stress concentrations or weaknesses in a component. Models can be used in wind-tunnels to test aerodynamic performance. They might be used as a tactile and visual aid in product design discussions regarding aesthetics and ergonomics.

 

 

 

 

3D FOR ENGINEERING

There are hundreds of ways in which 3D printing can be utilized to benefit the engineering industry. New applications of the technology are being explored and developed all the time. Currently most 3D materials are not as strong as ABS, the parts do not end up as smooth as those from an injection molded tool and the prices are much too high. We are working to change all three of those limitations. 

 

                                       

SUITABLE RESINS

Firm resin will allow you to print parts that are tough and durable. The properties of the finished part will allow additional processes such as tapping or machining.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


      ENGINEERING TIPS

When printing very large items, there are a few things to keep in mind. Firstly, does the item need to be solid? You can save a lot of resin, and money, by hollowing out a part. Some 3D printing software, such as Meshmixer, will enable you to do this easily. If you need the part to have some strength, a more generous wall thickness can be used (eg 4-5mm) or you could build an infill structure. Again, there is some software available that can do this automatically. If the part has no structural requirements, a thinner wall can be used (eg 2mm) and an impressive item can be printed using a surprisingly small volume of resin.



 

End-use Functional Parts

With the correct material choice, 3D printing can now generate end-use, functional parts. The technology excels where small batch or one-off production is necessary and can eliminate tooling costs. Bespoke items can be produced quickly and cheaply. It might be a fitted shoe sole customized to the unique shape of your foot, or a spare part that is obsolete or difficult to find. Even larger production runs may be suited to 3D printing if the desired geometry of a component is simply impossible to achieve any other way. There are now printers making metal parts with properties that match those of equivalent machined parts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Prototyping is where 3D printing first took off.
Scale models can be generated to test form, fit and function, ting first took off. Scale models can be generated tat a fraction of the cost of a machined or molded part, in a fraction of the time. Prototypes might be used in destructive testing to identify stress concentrations or weaknesses in a component. Models can be used in wind-tunnels to test aerodynamic performance. They might be used as a tactile and visual aid in product design discussions regarding aesthetics and ergonomics.

 

 

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